Tag: rockwell testers

6 Easy Steps to Testing Clutches with your Ames Portable Hardness Tester

Your Ames Portable Hardness Tester was designed for checking the hardness of materials in the Rockwell scales. This has become an asset to the racing industry which has developed a scale* for checking clutches using the Ames Portable Hardness Tester. The Ames tester helps to win races by providing repeatable results every time.

Featured in one of our promotions, Mike Bell, team II driver for Roy Hill Drag Racing, knows how important clutch plate survival is to victory in Pro Stock. Sudden heating can affect both surface and internal structure of clutch metals. Mike used Ames Rockwell Hardness Tester model 2 to check surface hardness of both plates before installation. He used the following recommended configuration. Roy Hill Drag Racing’s Ford Thunderbird set a Pro Stock National record of 6.73 seconds in 1995.

They provide the following recommendations for testing clutches* with your hardness tester in 6 easy steps:

To get yourself set up, make sure you have the following items: Model 2 Ames Portable Tester with a 1-inch anvil and 1/2 inch ball penetrator.

Step 1: Rotate the outer ring on the dial indicator and align the “dot” directly under the indicator needle. Position the clutch between the 1/2 inch ball penetrator and the 1-inch anvil. Make sure the surface is flat and the ball will not fall into holes or grooves.

Step 2: Rotate the handwheel clockwise until the needle on the gauge moves to the set position on the gauge face.

Step 3: Rotate the aluminum barrel counterclockwise so that the pin rests on top of the lucite magnifier

Step 4: Rotate the handwheel clockwise until the indicator needle reaches 60 on the indicator face.

Step 5: Immediately rotate the handwheel counterclockwise until the indicator is back at the set position.

Step 6: Read the black scale on the barrel. The thick line across the barrel is the whole number. (10, 20, 30, 40 etc.) The smaller hash marks on the left side of the barrel are in two-point increments.

Note: It has been established that using this method, test readings that fall between 65 to 80 give the best results.

You probably recognize former racing customers such as Massey Race Cars, Wayne County Speed, Stouts, Carl Smith, Glidden Racing, Ricky Smith Racing, Paul Rebeschi, Gary Brown Racing, Heck Racing, and Nickens Bros. Racing maintenance crews have come to rely on the results provided by Ames hardness testers.



*Please note that this is a special testing method designed by professionals in the racing industry for use as described in these steps and does not represent recommended testing methods for our Ames Portable Hardness Testers.  In this case, the ball penetrator is used and the “B” scale is read.  The ball penetrator is not used to produce readings in the “B” scale.

Ames Upgraded their Wooden Instrument Case in 2000

What you get when you purchase an Ames Hardness Tester has never changed, the case you get your tester in did. From the time Electro Arc purchased Ames Portable Hardness Testers in 1975, they were sold as a kit including the tester, a set of hardness test specimens, diamond and ball penetrators, and flat and “V” anvils. Models larger than 1″ also include a set of jaw-opening adapters.

Ames portable hardness testers have a very traditional, fine-instrument look to them. They should: they have been around manufacturing and metal shops for fifty years, quietly doing their jobs. In their highly varnished, dovetail-joined wooden cases, some of them have probably been mistaken for antiques. Ames announced sleek new cases for its proven line of portable, easy-to-use hardness testers in May of 2000. The smart black bolded high impact cases, with full loam cradling provide better protection for these precision instruments than the wooden cases previously supplied.

Although they are precision instruments and should be handled as such, they are surprisingly durable. Some Ames testers are still working perfectly after thirty years of service, an age at which other machines really are antiques. Accuracy testing and annual calibration are required to keep these testers testing accurately. To help Ames owners get the most value from their investment, we offer both calibration and repair services for your Ames tester.

This kit contains everything you need to take your portable hardness tester with you in a secure and durable case. Ames portability lends itself to the appeal of using Ames portable hardness testers. Easy to use with one hand, easy to learn to use, and applicable in a number of work environments. Ames portable Rockwell testers have been manufactured continuously under the Ames name for over seventy years and for over fifty years under Electro Arc (now owned by Stillion Industries). They are guaranteed to comply with ASTM standard E-110 for testing hardness in Rockwell scales, with no conversion needed.

All Ames testers are 100% made in the USA, now 97% of the parts are machined by Stillion Industries. All Ames testers are assembled, tested, and calibrated onsite at our facility in Dexter, Michigan.

Rockwell Hardness Charts for Metals

Ames Rockwell-Brinnell Conversion Chart

Our handy conversion chart helps you convert your Ames Hardness Readings from the Rockwell scales to Brinnell scales

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Choosing a Rockwell Hardness Scale

Below are a few charts that will help you choose the proper set up for your Ames Rockwell portable hardness tester. The charts cover the following :

All information included in this article is found in the Ames Tester Manual. Download it here.

Material to be tested – 

Very hard metals, soft and hard steel, aluminum, brass, and thinner materials can all be tested with our testers.

Brass and aluminum alloys can be handled by using a 1/16 ball

The penetrator that is needed – 

Very hard metals like tungsten carbide, and thin steel needs to be tested using a Diamond penetrator.

Brass and aluminum alloys can be handled by using a 1/16 ball

Brass and aluminum alloys can be handled by using a 1/16 ball

The major load to be applied – 

Your tester is guaranteed to +/- 1 point Rockwell. When using this tester, you must use extreme care to position the pointer exactly on the minor and major load marks.

Lastly, the correct Barrel dial setting – 

The upper line of the barrel’s hardness scales should be exactly aligned beneath the hairline on the magnifier.

Do you need to convert Brinell to Rockwell?  See our Rockwell/Brinell conversion chart.

 

Metal hardness chart scale Rockwell Metal Hardness Charts

Here are some commonly used scales on our models.

Frequently Used Rockwell Scales

Please contact us with any questions regarding proper maintenance and set up of our Rockwell testers.